Entrepreneurs

How to Survive and Prosper in This Time of Constant Change

In my role as a business advisor, I find that most still resist change, especially change they can’t control and did not choose, rather than accept it as the norm, and seek to capitalize on it.

I believe that that by adopting a more positive change mindset, you can actually make surfing the waves of change much more manageable, and even make your business and career fun again.

Thus I was pleased to see support for my perspective in a new book, “Flux: 8 Superpowers for Thriving in Constant Change,” by April Rinne, who is emerging as one of the leading futurists and change navigators for businesses, and individuals alike.

She offers some key strategies, often counterintuitive, which I will outline here, to drive a change mindset that we both recommend:

1. Slow down and appreciate what really matters.

When everything is in flux, we often feel stress to run faster to get ahead of all the changes. In fact, slowing down to evaluate what is really important to you is a better strategy, by reducing burnout, enhancing your productivity, and focusing you on items that allow you and your business to flourish.

2. Look for a change that most people don’t see.

What you need to thrive in this world of change is to develop the ability to perceive what is beyond the obvious, to discover new solutions that fit your aspirations and interests. This mindset will allow you to alter your direction in the most positive way, and drive customer change rather than be driven by it.

3. Seek out the unfamiliar, outside your comfort zone.

Adopt the mindset of a traveler, anticipating new adventures that will challenge your view of the world and reality. Remember back when you looked forward to these emotions as a challenge, expected to enjoy and learn from them, and they inspired you to new heights in your life and career.

4. Start with the trust that change is good, but verify.

We have all been burned at least once by trusting someone, but mistrust leads to inaction and fear. Learn to question all aspects of change, look for positive implications you can verify, and act on them. As a leader, you build trust in your team by communicating clearly, and implement change.

5. Reinforce your values in dealing with flux.

As change happens, it’s important to relate back to your base values and passions. Don’t let change lead you away from your personal values – dig deeply to find your fit with the new environment. The result will be just enough to meet your needs for growth and success in the business, without the pain.

6. Rethink your career as an evolving portfolio of jobs.

In this world of change, careers are no longer a singular path, but more likely a portfolio of evolving experiences and skills. For you smart professionals with endless curiosity and a desire to learn, the current gig economy has the potential for much more personal satisfaction, growth, and success.

7. Thrive by using your humanity to help others.

In a world with more robots, it’s more satisfying to use your humanity to serve other humans. I see a major change in consumer expectations for a total memorable human experience in guiding their loyalty, versus a technical transaction. Your worth and success depends on your value in helping others.

8. Let a better future emerge outside your control.

Letting go and minimizing your resistance enables a better future to evolve. Don’t allow yourself to get stuck in the past, fearing the future. Let your mindset shift from negative predictions and hesitation to positive preparations for new opportunities. Make the unknown a positive challenge.

The underlying message here is that we all must accept change in the marketplace as a given and an opportunity, not a painful and expensive problem that has to be solved.

By adopting a change mindset, our chances for success and satisfaction in our business and our career will be greatly increased. With the pace of change constantly increasing, don’t wait any longer to start.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

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