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Amanda Knox has given birth to daughter Eureka – but claimed in her podcast baby was yet to be born

Amanda Knox has given birth to a baby girl, she has revealed – but deliberately told listeners to her podcast that she was still pregnant in a bid to avoid a media scrum.

Knox, 34, and her husband Christopher Robinson, 39, welcomed daughter Eureka Muse Knox-Robinson ‘several months ago’, she told The New York Times.

Knox explained that she and Robinson, who married in 2020 in a time travel-themed wedding, wanted to keep their daughter’s arrival a secret and so documented her pregnancy in their podcast, Labyrinths, but kept the birth secret. 

‘I’m still nervous about the paparazzi bounty on her head,’ said Knox, speaking to the paper from their home on Vashon Island near Seattle, in Washington State.

‘I will say I’m excited to not have to keep pretending not to be a mom. 

‘Cause it’s like, my brain is just there.’

Amanda Knox is pictured with her newborn daughter, Eureka Muse. The little girl was born several months ago, Knox told The New York Times in an interview published on Friday

Knox and Robinson are pictured with their daughter Eureka at home in Vashon Island in Washington State

Knox and Robinson are pictured with their daughter Eureka at home in Vashon Island in Washington State

The pair would not give details of when their baby was born, and would only say 'several months ago'

The pair would not give details of when their baby was born, and would only say ‘several months ago’

Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson, a poet and novelist, have welcomed a daughter, Eureka. The couple married last year

Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson, a poet and novelist, have welcomed a daughter, Eureka. The couple married last year

Amanda Knox, now 34, is pictured in 2008 during her trial in Perugia, Italy, for the murder of Meredith Kercher. She was convicted and spent four years in prison, but then had her conviction overturned

Amanda Knox, now 34, is pictured in 2008 during her trial in Perugia, Italy, for the murder of Meredith Kercher. She was convicted and spent four years in prison, but then had her conviction overturned

Knox and her then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 36, were convicted of Kercher's murder in 2009 before being acquitted, convicted again and then finally definitely cleared in 2015. Pictured: The former couple in 2007, shortly after Kercher's body was found

Knox and her then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 36, were convicted of Kercher’s murder in 2009 before being acquitted, convicted again and then finally definitely cleared in 2015. Pictured: The former couple in 2007, shortly after Kercher’s body was found

Knox is pictured in a courtroom in Perugia in October 2011, when she was fighting her conviction for Kercher's murder

Knox is pictured in a courtroom in Perugia in October 2011, when she was fighting her conviction for Kercher’s murder

Knox told the paper that she was still struggling to find a balance between disliking the fame and needing to make money to live from.

She posted the photograph from her New York Times profile on Instagram, and captioned it: ‘Since my exoneration, I’ve struggled to reclaim my identity and protect the people I love from being exploited as tabloid content. 

‘It’s not easy, and I often feel like I’m trying to invent good choices out of bad whole cloth. 

‘I know that I cannot 100% protect my daughter from the kind of treatment I’ve suffered, but I’m doing the best I can. 

‘Which is why this will be the only picture of her I will ever share on social media. I’m so grateful to everyone who has wished @emceecarbon and I well on our journey to parenthood. 

‘Thank you for believing in us.’ 

Knox and Robinson produce a podcast called Labyrinths, in which they have discussed her pregnancy. They did not reveal that she had already given birth

Knox and Robinson produce a podcast called Labyrinths, in which they have discussed her pregnancy. They did not reveal that she had already given birth

Knox met Robinson when she interviewed him for her local newspaper, The West Seattle Herald, shortly after her final acquittal in 2015

Knox met Robinson when she interviewed him for her local newspaper, The West Seattle Herald, shortly after her final acquittal in 2015

Knox spent four years in prison in Perugia for the murder of her British roommate, Meredith Kercher, who was found dead in the house they shared in November 2007.

She was convicted in December 2009 and sentenced to 28 and a half years, but was acquitted in 2011 after an appeals court found that legal procedures had not been followed and there was no DNA tying her and then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito to the scene.

Meredith Kercher was sexually assaulted and stabbed to death in November 2007 while studying abroad in Perugia, in a case that garnered huge media attention

Meredith Kercher was sexually assaulted and stabbed to death in November 2007 while studying abroad in Perugia, in a case that garnered huge media attention

A local man, Rudy Guede, was convicted in a separate trial after his DNA was found on Kercher’s body and in the room where she died. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison in 2008, but was released in December 2020 and will spend the rest of his sentence doing community work.  

Knox was tried again in absentia, convicted again, and then ultimately had the conviction overturned by Italy’s highest court in 2015.

In 2013 Knox wrote a memoir, Waiting to Be Heard, for which she was given an advance of $3.8 million.

But her father Curt, an accountant, said that only around $200,000 of that remained after Knox had paid her legal bills; PR; the three mortgages her mother, father and grandmother took out to fund the fight; and a loan for her younger sister Deanna, who dropped out of college during the battle.

Knox and Robinson currently survive on the podcast, but are pitching a film adaptation of her memoir, a TV project about wrongful conviction, and a new book.

They also are considering, the paper reported, a series of NFTs out of famous tabloid covers with Knox’s face on them.  

‘What I keep telling Chris is that I want to get to a place where I don’t have to keep living the worst experience of my life so that we can pay the mortgage,’ Knox said.

‘I keep telling myself if all else fails, I can make cuckoo clocks for a living.’ 

Robinson, a novelist and poet, is working on a sci-fi novel and a nonfiction book about evolution, the future and psychedelics.

Knox has spent the decade since her release from prison finishing her undergraduate degree, in creative writing, at the University of Washington and then taking a series of low-paying jobs.

She worked in a used-book store and wrote for her local newspaper, initially under a pseudonym.

‘Getting a forward-facing, regular job was complicated by the fact that people would recognize me,’ she said.

Knox also became an advocate for others who said they were wrongfully convicted.

Knox is pictured in June 2019 speaking at the Criminal Justice Festival in Modena, Italy

Knox is pictured in June 2019 speaking at the Criminal Justice Festival in Modena, Italy

She spoke publicly about her experience in 2017, at a benefit in Seattle alongside Macklemore and Monica Lewinsky.

In 2019 she returned to Italy for the first time, to speak at a conference organized by the Italian Innocence Project, which did not exist in 2009 when she was on trial.

‘That’s the sort of trap I’m in, where I’m constantly having to be in conversation with something that I would rather not,’ Knox told the paper.

‘I’m constantly told that I should just disappear.’

While in Italy, she wrote to Giuliano Mignini, the prosecutor who secured her conviction.

The pair have been corresponding since, and Knox things that her meeting him might make an interesting documentary.  

Mignini has retired and is publishing a book on the case next year.

‘I am aware that finding herself far from home, at that age, she must certainly have suffered a lot,’ he told The New York Times. 

He acknowledged that she was portrayed ‘as a sort of Circe,’ he said, referring to the witch in Greek mythology who enchants men and turns them into pigs. 

Knox and Robinson attend the conference of the Criminal Justice Festival at the University of Modena in June 2019

Knox and Robinson attend the conference of the Criminal Justice Festival at the University of Modena in June 2019

She said that she struggled to return to her previous existence in Seattle.

At a welcome home party at her aunt’s house, she sat alone, remembered Tom Wright, a family friend. 

‘I said to her, ‘Are you OK?” he recalled. 

‘And she said, ‘I just want the people not in this room to know I’m innocent.’ 

Knox said that, at her parents’ home, she packed up bags of her old belongings such as stuffed toys and clothes and gave them all to Goodwill.

‘I’d gotten used to not having so many things,’ she said. ‘I felt totally overwhelmed.’

She still washed her underwear in the sink, and her family urged her to be kind to herself and take things slowly, but she insisted she did not want to ease back into life, and said she had lost four years.

‘You know, we were in survival mode for a while,’ said her mother, Edda Mellas, a teacher, who spent large chunks of time in Italy visiting her daughter in prison. 

‘At that point in time, she really couldn’t talk about it at all. She just cried.’ 

Knox said the Italian court’s decision in March 2013 to retry her had a devastating impact. 

‘I felt like I couldn’t even try to have a normal life because I was carrying this shroud over me,’ she said. 

‘In part, I was defiant. I felt like there was a deep injustice, so I didn’t change my name, I didn’t change my appearance. 

‘But I also felt defeated, like there was nothing I could do about it.’ 

Knox in a photo posted to Instagram. She said in her podcast that she was bemused by the 'misdirected focus on my sexuality'

Knox in a photo posted to Instagram. She said in her podcast that she was bemused by the ‘misdirected focus on my sexuality’

Knox met Robinson shortly after her final acquittal, in 2015, when she interviewed him for her local newspaper.

Robinson said he made a decision not to Google Knox before meeting her.

He said he was angry by people in Seattle who thought they knew all about her, from the media reports and the depiction of her as ‘Foxy Knoxy’. 

‘There are a lot of people who will say, with good intentions, like, ‘I’m really sorry that happened to you. I’m a weird, quirky person, too.’ 

‘Or, ‘You should be allowed to be quirky. It doesn’t mean you’re a killer.’ 

‘And it’s like, OK, but — did you even think for a minute that your perception of her behavior was mediated through a thousand other things?’ he said.

Knox added: ‘I wasn’t even that weird.’

She noted that she and her husband do like to go to Renaissance Fairs, and her brother-in-law, Kyle Robinson, performs in a medieval knights troupe.

Knox and her husband also went to DomCon, a dominatrix convention, where Knox stripped to her thong and was publicly flogged in a hotel ballroom, surrounded by other people. 

Knox said in her podcast: ‘The misdirected focus on my sexuality was one of the things that bothered me most about the trials. 

‘We started to wonder, what does a sex game gone right look like?’  

Robinson added: ‘Lots of people like going to Comic-Con, they’re not all accused of murder.’

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