UK-News

Covid UK: Daily death toll hits 96 in highest daily figure since MARCH as hospitalisations rise

Nearly 100 coronavirus deaths were recorded across Britain today in the country’s worst daily fatality toll for four months.

Department of Health bosses posted 96 Covid fatalities, up 92 per cent on last week and the most since March 24 (98), when the second wave was fading away.

Day-to-day counts fluctuate heavily and figures on Tuesdays are normally skewed by reporting lags from over the weekend. But the number of victims, which doesn’t simply represent how many people died overnight, has been rising for weeks, in line with the ferocious surge in cases seen throughout June.

Covid hospitalisations are also still increasing, with 745 admissions recorded on July 14 — the latest date data is available for. The figure was up by a third on the week before.

But in a slight glimmer of hope, the weekly growth in infections appears to be beginning to flatten out. Another 46,558 positive tests recorded today, up by 27 per cent in a week. However, the speed of increase when looking at the seven-day average for cases — which paints a more accurate picture of the size of the outbreak — shows the rate has fallen for the third day in a row. 

Meanwhile, No10 today refused to rule out making people prove they are double-jabbed to get into pubs, despite Tory rebels and civil liberties campaigners vowing to fight Boris Johnson’s ‘disgusting’ threat to restrict access to nightclubs. 

The Prime Minister — who is self-isolating after being ‘pinged’ — last night delivered an ultimatum to young people about the shape of the rules from September, telling a press conference that proof of double-vaccination will be a ‘condition of entry’ at clubs. 

When pushed on whether the prospective edict could apply to bars as well, Downing Street merely said it will ‘use the coming weeks to look at the evidence’.

In other developments today, the UK was left fearing a Summer of Discontent as the NHS Covid app continued to ‘ping’ swathes of the country into isolation. Weary Britons complained of fuel and food shortages, bin collection cancellations, railways delays, and scores of school and business closures. 

Covid UK: Daily death toll hits 96 in highest daily figure since MARCH as hospitalisations rise

Covid UK: Daily death toll hits 96 in highest daily figure since MARCH as hospitalisations rise

Covid UK: Daily death toll hits 96 in highest daily figure since MARCH as hospitalisations rise

Deaths in under-60s (light blue line) appear to remain flat while they are beginning to rise in over-60s (dark blue line). Daily deaths were seven times higher in over-60s (36) than under-60s (5) on July 15 in England

Deaths in under-60s (light blue line) appear to remain flat while they are beginning to rise in over-60s (dark blue line). Daily deaths were seven times higher in over-60s (36) than under-60s (5) on July 15 in England

There were 183 deaths linked to Covid in the week to July 9, the latest available. This was a 67 per cent rise compared to the same time last week and the most since April. They are shown on the graph (dark red bar)

There were 183 deaths linked to Covid in the week to July 9, the latest available. This was a 67 per cent rise compared to the same time last week and the most since April. They are shown on the graph (dark red bar)

Care home Covid deaths have, however, remained static despite growing cases in the community. There were 20 last week, and they have not risen above 30 since March

Care home Covid deaths have, however, remained static despite growing cases in the community. There were 20 last week, and they have not risen above 30 since March

Flu and pneumonia were also still blamed for more deaths than Covid in the latest week. They were behind 254 fatalities, compared to the 147 which noted Covid as the main cause of death

Flu and pneumonia were also still blamed for more deaths than Covid in the latest week. They were behind 254 fatalities, compared to the 147 which noted Covid as the main cause of death

No10 refuses to rule out making people prove they are double-jabbed to get into PUBS 

No10 today refused to rule out making people prove they are double-jabbed to get into pubs – as Tory rebels vowed to fight Boris Johnson’s ‘disgusting’ threat to restrict access to nightclubs.

The PM faces a furious backlash from MPs and civil liberties campaigners after delivering an ultimatum to young people about the shape of the rules from September at a press briefing last night. 

And pushed on whether the prospective edict could apply to bars as well Downing Street merely said it will ‘use the coming weeks to look at the evidence’. 

Former Supreme Court justice Lord Sumption said the move was ‘completely unnecessary’ given the high rates of vaccine take-up across the UK. 

Scientist Carl Heneghan suggested it is the thin end of the wedge, saying if the government is worried about ‘crowded spaces’ they will end up demanding medical evidence to board the Tube.   

And Professor Sir Jonathan Montgomery, who chaired the ethics advisory board for NHSx on its contact tracing app, warned that ministers need to be wary about ‘where incentive meets coercion’. Critics also pointed out that being vaccinated is not a guarantee people do not have coronavirus, with around 40 per cent of hospital cases having been jabbed.

Tory MP Charles Walker declared he will vote against the plan if it comes to the Commons after the summer recess. ‘It will start with nightclubs and then quickly move on to other parts of the hospitality sector,’ he told BBC Radio 4’s World at One.

Another senior lockdown-sceptic told MailOnline there are ‘likely’ to be enough Tory rebels. But they stressed a revolt would be ‘pointless’ unless Labour lines up against the measures.

‘It’s all about Keir Starmer… unless Labour go through the division lobbies in opposition it will happen,’ the MP said. 

The MP said the PM’s was using a ‘disgusting’ tactic to pressure young people to get jabs. ‘I am profoundly disgusted that a Conservative government is manipulating the public like this… it is awful,’ they said.

Asked whether pubs could also be caught by the requirement, a No10 spokesman said: ‘The Prime Minister talked about the sort of areas we were considering, and nightclubs are where there is significant evidence we have at the moment.

‘But we’re going to use the coming weeks to look at the evidence, particularly both in the UK and globally before making a specific decision.’ 

On another day of coronavirus chaos:

  • No10 refused to rule out making people prove they are double-jabbed to get into pubs as Tory rebels vowed to fight Boris Johnson’s ‘disgusting’ threat to restrict access to nightclubs;
  • The NHS Covid app continued to ‘ping’ swathes of the country into self-isolation with 1.7million people thought to be forced to stay at home;
  • MailOnline revealed plans are being drawn up that would require football fans to prove they have had two doses of Covid vaccination before they can attend matches from the end of September;
  • No10 slapped down a minister for saying people can ignore being ‘pinged’ by the NHS app if they think it is the ‘right thing’ to do;
  • A hospital trust has bought its local Nightingale Hospital to get surgery waiting lists for the county down;
  • One in five parents said they would be prepared to take their children out of the classroom to avoid ruining their summer staycation; 
  • Dominic Cummings claimed Boris Johnson attempted to resist pleas for a second lockdown last autumn, joking that the Covid pandemic was only killing pensioners. 

The latest Department of Health data for England shows daily deaths were seven times higher in over-60s (36) than under-60s (5) on July 15 — the most recent day an age breakdown is available for.

Separate NHS England data shows of the 165 deaths recorded in hospitals over the last week, 140 were in people aged 60 or older. Eighteen were aged 40 to 59, seven were between 20 and 39 and none were younger than 20. 

Addressing the spike in deaths today, Dr Yvonne Doyle, medical director at Public Health England, said: ‘The past 18 months have been tough on us all. 

‘Now restrictions have lifted many of us want to get back to doing what we enjoy most.

‘However, we must do so with caution and remain sensible. We are in a wave of infections that has seen an increase of over 40 per cent in the past week, there is still a risk of severe illness for many people.

‘We can all reduce the risk by getting both doses of the vaccine, testing ourselves twice a week at home and spending more time outside or in well ventilated rooms. Let’s all remain vigilant.’

Separate data today showed weekly Covid deaths have risen to their highest level since April. 

Office for National Statistics data showed 183 people had Covid mentioned on their death certificates in England and Wales in the week ending July 9, the latest available. 

This was two-thirds higher than the previous week and the most recorded since the second wave was dying down at the end of April and the country was under much stricter lockdown rules.

Despite deaths now starting to tick upwards — there are 42 on average every day now compared to 20 at the start of the month — they are still just a fraction of the levels seen during the worst of the second wave, when there were up to 1,800. 

Experts say fatalities will continue to climb as cases rise but the Government’s scientific advisers expect them to peak at 200 or below because of the success of the vaccines.  

The report found Covid deaths in care homes were also low despite surging cases in the community. There were 20 recorded in the latest week, and they have not risen above 30 since mid-April. 

Last month the ONS said the proportion of overall deaths in England and Wales blamed on the virus was just 1 per cent. Now that is estimated to be 2 per cent and rising. 

Every region of England saw an increase in Covid deaths but rates stayed flat in Wales, according to the weekly ONS report. 

Deaths from all causes surged six per cent above the five-year average in England and Wales, however, (shown) for the number of deaths expected at this time of year

Deaths from all causes surged six per cent above the five-year average in England and Wales, however, (shown) for the number of deaths expected at this time of year

But fatalities due to the virus in care homes remained static despite growing Covid cases in the community

But fatalities due to the virus in care homes remained static despite growing Covid cases in the community

‘Pingdemonium’ chaos sees ONE MILLION children off school, the pound PLUNGE, bins uncollected and food and fuel supplies running low

The UK was today left fearing a Summer of Discontent as the NHS Covid app continued to ‘ping’ swathes of the country into isolation – while weary Britons complained of fuel and food shortages, bin collection cancellations, railways delays, and scores of school and business closures.

Around 1.7million people are thought to be currently isolating at home after being notified by the app or contacted by Test & Trace, with the problem set to get much worse as cases keep rising.

More than a million pupils were out of the classroom last week, according to new Department of Education data, with 81,000 reporting a confirmed or suspected case of Covid and the rest self-isolating following a positive contact.

With the summer break just 48 hours away, parents are pulling their children out of classrooms to avoid having their staycations ruined, amid warnings from travel bosses that a lack of staff will leave holiday lets and attractions unable to open.

Staff shortages fuelled by self-isolating staff have seen green bin deliveries suspended in at least eight council areas, including Liverpool and Bristol, as shoppers took pictures of empty shelves and oil giant BP blamed petrol shortages at an M25 service station on the closure of a distribution centre.

Yet more schools, libraries, art galleries and hospitality venues today revealed fresh tales of woe, with one Bournemouth restaurant losing thousands of pounds after having to cancel 100 table covers when one chef received an app notification.

And in yet another economic blow, the pound plunged to its lowest level against the dollar for five months as investors fretted about a surge in infections that experts say will be exacerbated by Freedom Day. As of midday, one pound was worth 1.36 dollars – its lowest level since February.

The North West — which has battled a major outbreak of the Indian ‘Delta’ variant — suffered the most deaths (66), followed by London and the West Midlands (both 20). 

Meanwhile, the fewest Covid deaths were registered in the North East (eight) despite the region currently being hit hardest by the Indian variant, with case rates double the levels reached in the second wave. 

Deaths across the region will rise over the coming weeks because of the data lag between cases and fatalities — it can take over a fortnight for infected patients to fall seriously ill.

No10’s Chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance warned that yesterday’s easing of Covid rules in England would likely trigger a rise in Covid deaths nationwide.  

‘Freedom Day’ saw most remaining restrictions removed, with face masks made optional and night clubs allowed to reopen for the first time in 16 months.  

The ONS Covid death data looks at all cases in which the virus was listed on the death certificate.

It differs from the Department of Health’s death toll which looks at all patients who died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid, no matter the cause.  

It comes as cases hit their highest levels in months after breaking through the 40,000 barrier, amid fears they could reach 200,000 a day in August. 

Hospitalisations and deaths are also rising, but they remain at much lower levels than in previous waves because of the successful vaccination drive.

Scientists have always been honest and said jabs are not perfect and will not always prevent infection but they do drastically slash the risk of someone who catches the virus being hospitalised or dying.   

But in a clear sign they are working, analysis yesterday revealed Britain’s Covid death rate is now 16 times lower than it was during both the first and second waves. 

Infections are currently running at about 45,000 a day across Britain, with 40 deaths being registered every 24 hours on average. But the last time cases hit this level — when the second wave began to spiral out of control in late December — there were as many as 640 daily fatalities. 

It comes as the PM faces a furious backlash from MPs and civil liberties campaigners after delivering an ultimatum to young people about the shape of the rules from September at a press briefing last night.

Former Supreme Court justice Lord Sumption said the move to restrict access to nightclubs to the fully-vaccinated was ‘completely unnecessary’ given the high rates of vaccine take-up across the UK.

Scientist Carl Heneghan suggested it is the thin end of the wedge, saying if the government is worried about ‘crowded spaces’ they will end up demanding medical evidence to board the Tube.

And Professor Sir Jonathan Montgomery, who chaired the ethics advisory board for NHSx on its contact tracing app, warned that ministers need to be wary about ‘where incentive meets coercion’. 

Critics also pointed out that being vaccinated is not a guarantee people do not have coronavirus, with around 40 per cent of hospital cases having been jabbed. 

Infections are currently running at about 45,000 a day (yellow line shows cases increasing since May) but deaths are still flat at about 40 a day (pink line shows fatalities in the third wave). For comparison, the last time cases hit this level when the second wave began to spiral out of control (orange line) there were more than 600 daily deaths

Infections are currently running at about 45,000 a day (yellow line shows cases increasing since May) but deaths are still flat at about 40 a day (pink line shows fatalities in the third wave). For comparison, the last time cases hit this level when the second wave began to spiral out of control (orange line) there were more than 600 daily deaths

Most Related Links :
newsbinding Governmental News Finance News

Source link

Back to top button