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Home computing pioneer Sir Clive Sinclair dies aged 81 after a long illness

Sir Clive Sinclair dies aged 81: Tributes are paid to tech pioneer who brought computers into people’s homes with his ZX Spectrum… but failed to revolutionise transport with the C5

  • The inventor and entrepreneur passed away at his home in London this morning
  • His daughter Belinda, 57, revealed that the entrepreneur had passed away today
  • He was famed for bringing computers into people’s homes with his ZX Spectrum
  • He also created the pocket calculator but his C5 electric trike flopped in the 80s


Home computing pioneer Sir Clive Sinclair has died aged 81 following a long illness, his daughter revealed today.

The inventor and entrepreneur passed away at his home in London this morning, Belinda Sinclair said.

Sir Clive was famed for bringing computers into people’s homes with his ZX Spectrum, which proved inspirational for today’s games industry bosses.

They learnt the craft on his creation or its rival the Commodore 64 when they were growing up. Sir Clive also invented the pocket calculator.

Despite many successes during the inventor’s life, he failed to revolutionise transport with the Sinclair C5.

The battery-powered trike was launched in 1985 – with him expecting 100,000 sales in the first year – but it tanked and Sinclair Vehicles went into receivership that year.

The inventor and entrepreneur (pictured) passed away at his home in London this morning, Belinda Sinclair said

Despite many successes during the inventor's life, he failed to revolutionise transport with the Sinclair C5 (pictured)

Despite many successes during the inventor’s life, he failed to revolutionise transport with the Sinclair C5 (pictured)

Sir Clive (pictured with his ex-wife Angie Bowness) was famed for bringing computers into people's homes with his ZX Spectrum, which proved inspirational for today's games industry bosses

Sir Clive (pictured with his ex-wife Angie Bowness) was famed for bringing computers into people’s homes with his ZX Spectrum, which proved inspirational for today’s games industry bosses

Belinda, 57, told the Guardian: ‘He was a rather amazing person. Of course, he was so clever and he was always interested in everything.

‘My daughter and her husband are engineers so he’d be chatting engineering with them.’

She added: ‘It was the ideas, the challenge, that he found exciting. He’d come up with an idea and say, ”there’s no point in asking if someone wants it, because they can’t imagine it”.’

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