UK-News

Kate Middleton wears Zara blazer as she visits Coatbridge homeless charity with Prince William

The Duchess of Cambridge showcased her signature flair for diplomatic dressing as she joined husband Prince William for the second leg of his Scottish royal tour. 

Kate, 39, sported a £59.99 Zara blazer and pleated midi skirt by Hope Fashion in the colour of the Scottish flag for a visit to Turning Point Scotland, a social care charity in Coatbridge, North Lanarkshire. She also sported a pair of £1,395 ‘flora drop’ gold earrings from Scottish brand Hamilton & Inches, which has held a Royal Warrant as silversmiths to Her Majesty the Queen for more than 120 years.

The couple learned about the support the organisation provides to those facing homelessness, mental health issues and substance abuse. Later in the afternoon they visited the pioneering Scottish Violence Reduction Unit (SVRU), and learned about the support it provides to community organisations across the country.

In the evening they were joined in the café kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, where they are staying, by Sikh Sanjog to prepare meals which will be distributed to vulnerable families across the Edinburgh community. 

The visit is part of a royal charm offensive to help persuade Scotland to resist the demands of nationalists for independence. It received its effective launch over the weekend when William gave a deeply personal speech in which he described the ‘special place’ that Scotland had in his heart, a country which he said held both some of his ‘happiest memories’ and his ‘saddest’. 

It was at Balmoral where he learned of the death of his mother Diana, in 1997. And it was at St Andrews where he met and fell in love with Kate Middleton. 

William, 38, arrived in Scotland on Friday and will be joined by Kate on the remainder of his engagements on the week-long tour to win hearts and minds. The couple will return to London on Thursday. 

Royals on tour! The Duchess of Cambridge has joined William in Scotland. Kate sported a £59.99 Zara blazer and pleated midi skirt in the colour of the Scottish flag for a visit to Turning Point Scotland, a social care charity in Coatbridge

Royal charm offensive: The visit is part of a royal strategy to help persuade Scotland to resist the demands of nationalists for independence. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Turning Point Scotland today

Royal charm offensive: The visit is part of a royal strategy to help persuade Scotland to resist the demands of nationalists for independence. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Turning Point Scotland today

Beaming: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smiled as they learned more about the services offered by the charity

Beaming: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smiled as they learned more about the services offered by the charity

True blue! The Duchess of Cambridge wore a skirt and jacket in the blue of the Scottish flag for the visit today

True blue! The Duchess of Cambridge wore a skirt and jacket in the blue of the Scottish flag for the visit today

Today the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge spoke with individuals supported by Turning Point Scotland’s (TPS) Turnaround service. 

Turnaround delivers targeted programmes to address the complex and interrelated issues of offending behaviours and problematic use of alcohol and other drugs, which often result in patterns of re-offending. 

During their visit, The Duke and Duchess joined a video call with staff and service users from TPS’ Glasgow Overdose Response Team (GORT), to hear how the service works to reduce drug related deaths by providing real-time crisis support for people who have experienced a near fatal overdose. 

This afternoon, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge carried out a visit to East Lothian to learn about the impact of the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit, a national centre of expertise in tackling violence, founded in 2005 by Strathclyde Police, who in the face of rising homicide rates wanted to try a different approach to tackling violence. Working in partnership with Police Scotland and the Scottish Government, the SVRU aims to stop violence wherever it is found by using a public health approach to tackle the root causes of violent behaviours.

At Heavy Sound, one of the SVRU’s partners, William and Kate heard how the two organisations work closely together to help keep young people engaged in education or training and on the right path. Obtaining skills and qualifications can be crucial to preventing young people becoming vulnerable to violence. 

The Duke and Duchess met young people supported by the service to hear about their experiences, and how coming to the centre has inspired them to pursue qualifications in subject areas such as music production and bike maintenance. They also joined a group of service users taking part in a Muay Thai boxing session which aims to teach young people discipline and de-escalation techniques. 

This afternoon, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge carried out a visit to East Lothian to learn about the impact of the pioneering Scottish Violence Reduction Unit (SVRU), and the support it provides to community organisations across the country

This afternoon, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge carried out a visit to East Lothian to learn about the impact of the pioneering Scottish Violence Reduction Unit (SVRU), and the support it provides to community organisations across the country

The Scottish Violence Reduction Unit is a national centre of expertise in tackling violence, founded in 2005 by Strathclyde Police, who in the face of rising homicide rates wanted to try a different approach to tackling violence

The Scottish Violence Reduction Unit is a national centre of expertise in tackling violence, founded in 2005 by Strathclyde Police, who in the face of rising homicide rates wanted to try a different approach to tackling violence

The Scottish Violence Reduction Unit is a national centre of expertise in tackling violence, founded in 2005 by Strathclyde Police, who in the face of rising homicide rates wanted to try a different approach to tackling violence. Pictured: the Duke and Duchess on their visit there today

The couple learned about the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit (SVRU), and the support it provides to community organisations (pictured: Kate)

The couple learned about the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit (SVRU), and the support it provides to community organisations (pictured: Kate)

Working in partnership with Police Scotland and the Scottish Government, the SVRU aims to stop violence wherever it is found by using a public health approach to tackle the root causes of violent behaviours. Pictured: the Duke and Duchess today

Working in partnership with Police Scotland and the Scottish Government, the SVRU aims to stop violence wherever it is found by using a public health approach to tackle the root causes of violent behaviours. Pictured: the Duke and Duchess today

At Heavy Sound, one of the SVRU’s partners, William and Kate heard how the two organisations work closely together to help keep young people engaged in education or training and on the right path

At Heavy Sound, one of the SVRU’s partners, William and Kate heard how the two organisations work closely together to help keep young people engaged in education or training and on the right path

At Heavy Sound, one of the SVRU’s partners, William and Kate heard how the two organisations work closely together to help keep young people engaged in education or training and on the right path. Heavy Sound aims to make learning work for vulnerable and disadvantaged young people who are excluded or fall out of education and works to re-engage them through delivering innovative projects tailored to their interests, including song writing, DJ’ing, music production, and sound recording (Pictured: Kate had a go at making a tune)

The Duke and Duchess met young people supported by the service to hear about their experiences, and how coming to the centre has inspired them to pursue qualifications in subject areas such as music production and bike maintenance. They also joined a group of service users taking part in a Muay Thai boxing session which aims to teach young people discipline and de-escalation techniques

The Duke and Duchess met young people supported by the service to hear about their experiences, and how coming to the centre has inspired them to pursue qualifications in subject areas such as music production and bike maintenance. They also joined a group of service users taking part in a Muay Thai boxing session which aims to teach young people discipline and de-escalation techniques

The Cambridges wore protective face coverings to combat the spread of the coronavirus during a visit to a violence reduction unit, helping to reduce violence and knife crime across Scotland, in Prestonpans, near Edinburgh. Pictured watching a group of service users taking part in a Muay Thai boxing session

The Cambridges wore protective face coverings to combat the spread of the coronavirus during a visit to a violence reduction unit, helping to reduce violence and knife crime across Scotland, in Prestonpans, near Edinburgh. Pictured watching a group of service users taking part in a Muay Thai boxing session

The SVRU and Heavy Sound began working in partnership, alongside the Scottish Prison Service, in 2019 when they transformed an out of service bus into a mobile community centre, taking support, advice and music into the heart of neighbourhoods in and around Edinburgh. 

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the bus was redeployed to provide vulnerable young people with a safe place to go, as well as providing lunches to those in need within their community. 

During the visit, staff spoke to the Duke and Duchess about their collaborative work on the project, and how the SVRU has continued to work with Heavy Sound, including embedding one of its officers at the centre in order to help the young people it supports build positive relationships with the police and the justice system.

Heavy Sound aims to make learning work for vulnerable and disadvantaged young people who are excluded or fall out of education and works to re-engage them through delivering innovative projects tailored to their interests, including song writing, DJ’ing, music production, and sound recording. 

Through positive engagement, they aim to improve life chances and move young people to positive futures. Focussing on prevention and early intervention, Heavy Sound works to provide a supportive space for young people to express themselves and learn new skills, whilst simultaneously addressing issues around self-confidence, self-esteem and general wellbeing. 

Through positive engagement, they aim to improve life chances and move young people to positive futures. Focussing on prevention and early intervention, Heavy Sound works to provide a supportive space for young people to express themselves and learn new skills, whilst simultaneously addressing issues around self-confidence, self-esteem and general wellbeing. The Duke and Duchess met young people and staff to hear about their experiences

Through positive engagement, they aim to improve life chances and move young people to positive futures. Focussing on prevention and early intervention, Heavy Sound works to provide a supportive space for young people to express themselves and learn new skills, whilst simultaneously addressing issues around self-confidence, self-esteem and general wellbeing. The Duke and Duchess met young people and staff to hear about their experiences

During the visit, staff spoke to the Duke and Duchess about their collaborative work on the project, and how the SVRU has continued to work with Heavy Sound, including embedding one of its officers at the centre in order to help the young people it supports build positive relationships with the police and the justice system

During the visit, staff spoke to the Duke and Duchess about their collaborative work on the project, and how the SVRU has continued to work with Heavy Sound, including embedding one of its officers at the centre in order to help the young people it supports build positive relationships with the police and the justice system

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on their visit to the violence reduction unit, where they met and spoke with young people who benefit from its services

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on their visit to the violence reduction unit, where they met and spoke with young people who benefit from its services

Prince William and his wife appeared in high spirits during the visit today, despite the recent drama surrounding the Duke and Duchess of Sussex

Prince William and his wife appeared in high spirits during the visit today, despite the recent drama surrounding the Duke and Duchess of Sussex

This evening, the couple welcomed volunteers from Sikh Sanjog to the Palace of Holyroodhouse and joined them to make chappatis and package up curries in the Palace’s café kitchen. The meals will be distributed to vulnerable families in Edinburgh this evening. 

Sikh Sanjog Scotland’s only Sikh Family Support Charity was established in 1989 to support women from the Sikh community integrate into wider Scottish society. 

The organisation aims to inspire and empower women to advance their own life opportunities through building skills, confidence and promoting social inclusion. It provides social and wellbeing support for women of all ages and works with young people from diverse ethnic communities, delivering counselling services and facilitating youth groups.

During lockdown, Sikh Sanjog set up a service to provide hot curry meals twice a week to disadvantaged people in the community, a service that is ongoing. 

This evening, the couple welcomed volunteers from Sikh Sanjog to the Palace of Holyroodhouse and joined them to make chappatis and package up curries in the Palace's café kitchen

This evening, the couple welcomed volunteers from Sikh Sanjog to the Palace of Holyroodhouse and joined them to make chappatis and package up curries in the Palace’s café kitchen

The famously competitive couple got busy in the kitchen. The meals will be distributed to vulnerable families in Edinburgh this evening

The famously competitive couple got busy in the kitchen. The meals will be distributed to vulnerable families in Edinburgh this evening

The Duchess - who is reportedly the more accomplished cook of the two - appeared to be giving her husband some tipsas they prepared the meals

The Duchess – who is reportedly the more accomplished cook of the two – appeared to be giving her husband some tipsas they prepared the meals

Sikh Sanjog Scotland’s only Sikh Family Support Charity was established in 1989 to support women from the Sikh community integrate into wider Scottish society. Pictured: William and Kate perfect their chappatis

Sikh Sanjog Scotland’s only Sikh Family Support Charity was established in 1989 to support women from the Sikh community integrate into wider Scottish society. Pictured: William and Kate perfect their chappatis

The organisation aims to inspire and empower women to advance their own life opportunities through building skills, confidence and promoting social inclusion. It provides social and wellbeing support for women of all ages and works with young people from diverse ethnic communities, delivering counselling services and facilitating youth groups. Pictured: Kate serving up a curry

The organisation aims to inspire and empower women to advance their own life opportunities through building skills, confidence and promoting social inclusion. It provides social and wellbeing support for women of all ages and works with young people from diverse ethnic communities, delivering counselling services and facilitating youth groups. Pictured: Kate serving up a curry

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge help prepare meals with representatives of Sikh Sanjog. After rolling out their chappatis the challenge was to cook them

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge help prepare meals with representatives of Sikh Sanjog. After rolling out their chappatis the challenge was to cook them

William and Kate then heard from some of those who receive support from the organisation, before meeting members of one of the organisation’s youth groups who were preparing entries for a competition to design the cover of a new book being released by Sikh Sanjog. Finally, The Duke and Duchess met the women’s group, who gave a traditional Sikh Shabadh drumming display.

Exact details of their Scottish tour schedule is being kept under wraps but the Duke and Duchess are expected to visit St Andrews University, where they met as students 20 years ago. 

The couple will also host a special drive-in screening of Disney’s Cruella for NHS staff, and will join young carers from the local Fife area for a session of land yachting on the beach. The trip will also include the couple’s first official visit to Orkney.   

Pressure for a second independence referendum has increased after the Scottish National Party narrowly missed winning a majority in the Scottish Parliament. Public opinion about independence is on a knife edge according to polls and First Minister Nicola Sturgeon wants a vote before the end of 2023.

William and Kate then heard from some of those who receive support from the organisation, before meeting members of one of the organisation's youth groups who were preparing entries for a competition to design the cover of a new book being released by Sikh Sanjog

William and Kate then heard from some of those who receive support from the organisation, before meeting members of one of the organisation’s youth groups who were preparing entries for a competition to design the cover of a new book being released by Sikh Sanjog

The Duchess of Cambridge meets children from the Sikh Sanjog childrens group, part of a Sikh community group, in the cafe kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse

The Duchess of Cambridge meets children from the Sikh Sanjog childrens group, part of a Sikh community group, in the cafe kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse

In her element! The Duchess looked delighted to be chatting with the youngsters from the Sikh Sanjog childrens group, part of a Sikh community group, in the cafe kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse

In her element! The Duchess looked delighted to be chatting with the youngsters from the Sikh Sanjog childrens group, part of a Sikh community group, in the cafe kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse

The Duchess got stuck in helping some of the young children with their entries for a competition to design the cover of a new book being released by Sikh Sanjog

The Duchess got stuck in helping some of the young children with their entries for a competition to design the cover of a new book being released by Sikh Sanjog

Dressed all in blue, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are pictured arriving to help prepare meals with representatives of Sikh Sanjog

Dressed all in blue, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are pictured arriving to help prepare meals with representatives of Sikh Sanjog

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with representatives of Sikh Sanjog, a Sikh community group in the cafe kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with representatives of Sikh Sanjog, a Sikh community group in the cafe kitchen at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh

Finally the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met the women’s group, who gave a traditional Sikh Shabadh drumming display which they appeared to enjoy

Finally the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met the women’s group, who gave a traditional Sikh Shabadh drumming display which they appeared to enjoy

Queen of coordination: The Duchess of Cambridge chose a blue patterned face mask for the outing

Queen of coordination: The Duchess of Cambridge chose a blue patterned face mask for the outing

Vital work: The couple learned about the support the organisation provides to those facing homelessness, mental health issues and substance abuse. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge speak to people who have used the services

Vital work: The couple learned about the support the organisation provides to those facing homelessness, mental health issues and substance abuse. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge speak to people who have used the services

Vibrant: The Duchess of Cambridge opted for a monochrome look for the visit to the Scottish charity today

Vibrant: The Duchess of Cambridge opted for a monochrome look for the visit to the Scottish charity today

The Duchess of Cambridge looked elegant in a royal blue blazer for the charity visit in North Lanarkshire today

The Duchess of Cambridge looked elegant in a royal blue blazer for the charity visit in North Lanarkshire today

Officials at No 10 have held discussions about how to emphasise ‘cultural bonds’ – with the Royal Family seen as one of the most powerful weapons in the armoury.

The Queen is passionate about the union and spends her annual summer break at Balmoral.

Her subtle comment about the independence referendum in 2014 – asking people to ‘think carefully about the future’ – while staying at Balmoral, was credited with influencing the vote to remain.

In his address on Saturday to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in Edinburgh, Prince William not only touched upon some of the most private aspects of his life, but also struck a conciliatory tone.

‘It is my duty today to speak, but equally I am here to listen,’ he said. ‘In Scotland this week I will have my eyes and ears permanently open. Along with listening this week, there is something I do want to tell you.

‘Scotland is incredibly important to me and will always have a special place in my heart.’

William, who is known as the Earl of Strathearn in Scotland, was speaking in his role as Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly, a ceremonial appointment dating back to the 16th Century. 

He spoke of his happy time at St Andrews university as a student and training as a pilot in Inverness, adding: ‘Scotland is the source of some of my happiest memories. But also my saddest.’

Far-reaching: During their visit, The Duke and Duchess joined a video call with staff and service users from TPS' Glasgow Overdose Response Team (GORT), to hear how the service works to reduce drug related deaths by providing real-time crisis support for people who have experienced a near fatal overdose, pictured

Far-reaching: During their visit, The Duke and Duchess joined a video call with staff and service users from TPS’ Glasgow Overdose Response Team (GORT), to hear how the service works to reduce drug related deaths by providing real-time crisis support for people who have experienced a near fatal overdose, pictured

First-hand experience: William and Kate spoke to people who had benefited from Turning Point Scotland's services

First-hand experience: William and Kate spoke to people who had benefited from Turning Point Scotland’s services

Virtual meeting: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge spoke to some people via videolink during the outing

Virtual meeting: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge spoke to some people via videolink during the outing

In what was interpreted as a nod to longevity, he referred to his children including Prince George, who is third in line to the throne. ‘George, Charlotte and Louis already know how dear Scotland is to both of us, and they are starting to build their own happy memories here too,’ he said. ‘We have no doubt they will grow up sharing our love and connection to Scotland from the Highlands to the Central Belt, from the Islands to the Borders.’

The Queen, who on Saturday visited the crew of the aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth in Portsmouth, made her own apparent comment about a ‘United Kingdom’ in a letter to the Church of Scotland which was read out by her chaplain in Scotland, the Rev Dr George Whyte.

In reference to changes that have taken place during the coronavirus pandemic, she wrote: ‘New bonds have been forged in times of emergency but they will serve us all well in the future as the United Kingdom seeks to rebuild and reshape community life.’

The Queen is making plans for her traditional ‘Holyrood Week’ in early summer. Aides say there will be several ‘high-profile events where Her Majesty will be seen out and about’. 

The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall will also be involved but the decision to send the Cambridges ahead was a clear part of the PR strategy. A source told the Mail On Sunday: ‘It’s about opening a dialogue – listening and talking. All members of the Royal Family have a strong affinity with Scotland.

At the weekend the Duke of Cambridge took an electric car for a high-speed spin around a race track at the Knockhill circuit in Fife, part of a programme of visits to innovative projects north of the border aimed at tackling climate change.

The prince met with British Andretti United driver, Catie Munnings, a former European Rally Champion, to test drive the new electric Extreme E car ahead of the Extreme E race in Senegal this weekend. 

Later William looked happy and relaxed as he grabbed a pint with members of the emergency services at a rooftop bar near Edinburgh Castle to watch the Scottish Cup Final. 

Prince William met with British Andretti United driver, Catie Munnings, pictured together, a former European Rally Champion, to test drive the new electric Extreme E car ahead of the Extreme E race in Senegal this weekend

Prince William met with British Andretti United driver, Catie Munnings, pictured together, a former European Rally Champion, to test drive the new electric Extreme E car ahead of the Extreme E race in Senegal this weekend

Most Related Links :
newsbinding Governmental News Finance News

Source link

Back to top button