UK-News

Queen wears pair of aquamarine brooches given to her by her parents to State Opening of Parliament

The Queen wore a pair of aquamarine brooches given to her by her parents for the State Opening of Parliament today. 

The Queen, 95, looked elegant in a pale grey-blue ensemble as she carried out her first public duty since the death of her husband the Duke Edinburgh last month. 

She accessorised her spring coat with a pair of diamond and aquamarine brooches gifted to her by her parents, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, later the Queen Mother, on her 18th birthday in April 1944. 

The Queen was joined at the engagement by Prince Charles, 72, and the Duchess of Cornwall, 73. 

Personal treasures: The Queen wore a pair of aquamarine brooches given to her by her parents for the State Opening of Parliament today

Dazzling duo: The art deco-style Boucheron clips have become a favourite of the Queen

Dazzling duo: The art deco-style Boucheron clips have become a favourite of the Queen

By his mother's side: The Queen was accompanied by her son Prince Charles today, pictured

By his mother’s side: The Queen was accompanied by her son Prince Charles today, pictured

Birthday girl: The then Princess Elizabeth with her parents on her 18th birthday. She was given the aquamarine brooches as a gift, although she is not wearing them here

Birthday girl: The then Princess Elizabeth with her parents on her 18th birthday. She was given the aquamarine brooches as a gift, although she is not wearing them here

The art deco-style Boucheron clips have become a favourite of the Queen. She most recently wore the jewels to deliver her televised message on the 75th anniversary of VE Day in May 2020. 

The brooches are made of aquamarine and diamonds, and in a typical 1940s design combine baguette, oval and round stones.

The distinctive style of the brooches – one often used by Cartier – led many jewellery experts to believe the clips were actually the work of the brand, which is why they are often incorrectly identified as the Cartier aquamarine clips. 

However, they were correctly identified as Boucheron ones in Leslie Field’s The Queen’s Jewels. 

The clips can be worn in a number of different ways: as matching clips, on either shoulder or as a single brooch.

The Queen usually wears them – as she did today – as separate clips, one above the other, on her left shoulder.

Favourite accessory: The Queen wore the brooches to deliver her VE Day message last year

Attending a reception to mark the Centenary of the Women's Royal Navy Service at the Army and Navy Club in 2017

Favourite accessory: The Queen wore the brooches to deliver her VE Day anniversary message last year (left). Right, attending a reception to mark the Centenary of the Women’s Royal Navy Service at the Army and Navy Club in 2017

True blue: Due to the transluscent nature of the jewels, the Queen typically wears them with blue or pale purple fabrics that enhance the natural colour. Pictured, in 2012

True blue: Due to the transluscent nature of the jewels, the Queen typically wears them with blue or pale purple fabrics that enhance the natural colour. Pictured, in 2012

Due to the translucent nature of the jewels, the Queen typically wears them with blue or pale purple fabrics that enhance the natural colour. 

Today the Queen opted for a blue-grey coat with yellow floral embroidery around the neckline, which she wore over a silver dress with matching gold floral detailing. 

She finished the look with a purple and gold hat with floral and feather applique.  The Queen wore the same ensemble to Royal Ascot in 2019. 

Recycled: Today the Queen opted for a blue-grey coat with yellow floral embroidery around the neckline, which she wore over a silver dress with matching gold floral detailing. The Queen wore the same ensemble to Royal Ascot in 2019, pictured

Recycled: Today the Queen opted for a blue-grey coat with yellow floral embroidery around the neckline, which she wore over a silver dress with matching gold floral detailing. The Queen wore the same ensemble to Royal Ascot in 2019, pictured

The Queen sat alone today, with the consort’s throne removed from the State Opening of Parliament ceremony for the first time in 120 years.  

The Prince of Wales has previously sat on the consort’s throne when accompanying the Queen. But during today’s ceremony, Charles sat with the Duchess of Cornwall on chairs of state – placed to the side. 

Charles’s presence at her side this year, so soon after the death of Philip aged 99 on April 9, will be seen as a sign of things to come at future royal engagements. 

Earlier today Prince Charles paid a touching tribute to his father Prince Philip in a video message marking the end of Ramadan and said that like so many families this year, his own will also have an ’empty seat at their dinner table.’  

Prince Charles, 72, paid a touching tribute to his late father Prince Philip in a video message marking the end of Ramadan and said that like so many families this year, his own will also have an 'empty seat at their dinner table'

Prince Charles, 72, paid a touching tribute to his late father Prince Philip in a video message marking the end of Ramadan and said that like so many families this year, his own will also have an ’empty seat at their dinner table’

In a heartfelt address made during a virtual Iftar – the communal breaking of the fast – the Prince of Wales, 72, spoke out about the devastating impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the country.   

He said: ‘The last year I know has been deeply challenging for us all, and I am only too aware of the impact of the pandemic on the Muslim community.

‘This year so many families, like my own, will have an empty seat at their dinner table and friends will no longer be able to share the celebratory hug after Eid prayers.’ 

He continued: ‘I can only say how deeply saddened I am by this tragic situation and how my heart goes out to all those who have lost their loved ones.’ 

The Iftar appearance was organised by the Naz Legacy Foundation and also included contributions from Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, the Bishop of London and the Chief Rabbi. 

The online event was just one in a series of virtual celebrations aimed at encouraging people to stay at home during Ramadan, which will end on Wednesday. 

Most Related Links :
newsbinding Governmental News Finance News

Source link

Back to top button